Faculty Seminar: "Emancipation Narratives in the Arts" with Lydia Goehr

May 2, 2016 - 11:00am to May 6, 2016 - 2:00pm

This year’s topic for the Faculty Seminar is “Emancipation Narratives in the Arts.” It will involve issues of theory and history across instances of philosophy, opera, and the arts.

The Seminar will take place 11am-1pm, every day from Monday through Friday, in the Humanities Center, 602 CL, followed by informal lunch.


Lydia Goehr will lead this year’s seminar. Professor Goehr is Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University, where she has won the Lenfest Distinguished Faculty Award and two major awards for teaching. She specializes in Aesthetics, Philosophy of Music, Critical Theory and the Philosophy of History. She is the author of The Imaginary Museum of Musical Works: An Essay in the Philosophy of Music (1992; 2d ed. 2007; The Quest for Voice: Music, Politics, and the Limits of Philosophy (1998); Elective Affinities: Musical Essays on the History of Aesthetic Theory (2008), and co-editor with Daniel Herwitz of The Don Giovanni Moment. Essays on the legacy of an Opera (2006).

Professor Goehr intends in the Seminar to discuss philosophical essays on politics and the arts by herself, T. W. Adorno, and Arthur Danto. She will engage  a variety of the arts,  especially opera, film, painting, and music. Her current projects, which she will partially present in her public lecture, are on the social and artistic history of the Concept of Boheme and on the Contest of the Arts.

 

SCHEDULE: 

Monday, May 2:  Arthur Danto  "The Transfiguration of the Commonplace” [the article version of 1974] and "Three Decades After the End of Art”

Tuesday, May 3: Lydia Goehr,  "‘All Art Constantly Aspires to the Condition of Music” —except the art of music. Reviewing the contest of the sister arts” 

4:00 PM - 501 Cathedral of Learning: Lecture: “Reading Danto’s Red Squares as a Political Thought Experiment, Or, From the Red Sea to the Modern Monochrome” (An Introduction to Goehr’s new book project on emancipation narratives in the arts)

Wednesday, May 4: Lydia Goehr "Improvising Impromptu. Or, What to Do with a Broken String” [with FILM of HARLEM RENAISSANCE “Broken Strings”]

Thursday, May 5: T. W Adorno, "The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Deception” and “On Jazz" 

Friday, May 6: Lydia Goehr, “What anyway is a “Music Discomposed?” Reading Cavell through the dark glasses of Adorno"     

All readings for the seminars can be found here.

Lydia Goehr will lead this year’s seminar. She is Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University, where she has won the Lenfest Distinguished Faculty Award and two major awards for teaching. Her strongest interests are Aesthetics, Critical Theory and Philosophy of History, all with special reference to music.